Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 12th Annual
Pharma Middle East Congress Dubai, UAE.

Day 1 :

OMICS International Pharma Middle East 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker  Raid G Alany photo
Biography:

Professor Raid Alany is a registered New Zealand Pharmacist with a PhD from the University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand. He is the Inaugural Head of School of Life Sciences, Pharmacy and Chemistry at Kingston University London, UK; holds an honorary professorship at the University of Auckland, New Zealand. He is the Editor-in-Chief of Pharmaceutical Development and Technology (Taylor and Francis) and Immediate Past President of the New Zealand Chapter of the Controlled Release Society. Raid’s research is on ophthalmic drug delivery, lipid and surfactant-based systems, in-situ gels and animal health. He holds international patents that have been commercialized in New Zealand and Australia where he consults for animal health companies, regulatory bodies and IP-specialized law firms. His research gate score is 35.72 and his h-index is 21 (google scholar).

Abstract:

Currently, there are 26 UK-based universities that offer the Master of Pharmacy (MPharm) degree which is one of the main requirements to practice pharmacy in the UK. To register as a pharmacist in the UK, one must successfully complete a GPhC accredited (MPharm) course, which is a full-time, four-year course followed by successful completion of one year's pre-registration training, a period of paid employment in a community or hospital pharmacy during which a trainee is required to build up a portfolio of evidence and demonstrate their competence whilst being observed at work. This is followed by successful completion of the GPhC's registration exam along with meeting the fitness to practice requirements for registration as a pharmacist. On the other hand; courses in pharmaceutical sciences (BSc and MSc) throughout the UK are aimed at training graduates and preparing them to work in the pharmaceutical industry or specialize in regulatory affairs or clinical trials.

Universities in the UK are reaching out to universities around the world to establish partnerships for joint provision. Such partnerships could come in various shapes and forms. The QAA UK Quality Code defines collaborative provision as ‘learning opportunities leading or contributing to the award of academic credit or a qualification that are delivered, assessed or supported through an arrangement with one or more organizations other than the degree-awarding body’. Validation, franchise, dual degree, double degree, joint degree, articulation and placements are terms that are used in this context and could be rather confusing.

This key note will cover the key aspects of pharmacy / pharmaceutical sciences education in the UK. This will be followed by an explanation of the various forms of joint academic provision that are already in place and are available to pursue by universities in the Middle East should they wish to partner with a UK-based university.

Keynote Forum

Heyam Saad Ali

Dubai Pharmacy College, UAE

Keynote: Nanotechnology Applications

Time : 10:15-11:00

OMICS International Pharma Middle East 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Heyam Saad Ali photo
Biography:

Prof. Heyam Saad Ali has completed her PhD from Bradford University, UK. She is working as a head of pharmaceutics department, head of quality assurance and auditing  unit  of Dubai Pharmacy college, UAE,  since 2000.She has teaching and research experience of about 25 years. She is a member of various pharmaceutical associations. She contributed more than 50 articles to reputed international scientific journals in different controlled and targeted drug delivery systems.  She has been invited as speaker to numerous International conferences .She is reviewer and member of editorial board of many international pharmaceutical journals.

Abstract:

Nanotechnology is the study of extremely small structures. It can be used for a broad range of applications and the creation of various types of nano materials, nano devices, and nano- systems, due to their unique properties. This presentation will include: different manufacturing approaches, aspects and scope of nanotechnology. The advancement of nanotechnology and its applications to in the field of medicines and pharmaceuticals in different areas has revolutionized the twentieth century.  Pharmaceutical Applications of nano particles in drug delivery and protein and peptide delivery, has impact in drug development, bioavailability, stability.  Clinical Applications of nanotechnology in various nano systems in cancer therapy such as carbon nano tube, dendrimers, nano crystal, nano wire, nano shells etc and in operative dentistry, ophthalmology, surgery, visualization, tissue engineering, antibiotic resistance, immune response and  the treatment of neuro degenerative disorders, tuberculosis, and Parkinson’s disease and Alzheimer’s disease.

  • Sessions:
    Clinical Pharmacy and Pharmacotherapeutics | Industrial Pharmacy and Pharmacy Practice | Drugs and Regulations

Session Introduction

Sawsan Abuhamdah

Al Ain University of Science and Technology, UAE

Title: Melissa officinalis L. essential oil as potential treatment for agitation in people with severe dementia
Speaker
Biography:

Dr. Sawsan Abuhamdah is a Jordanian registered Pharmacist, has completed her PhD from Durham University, UK and postdoctoral studies from Granada Medical School, Department of Pharmacology, Spain and has won postdoctoral Fulbright Research Award at the University of Toledo, Department of pharmacology and experimental therapeutics, Ohio, USA, 2014-2015. Promoted to associate professor in 2014 at the faculty of pharmacy, University of Jordan and now acting as deputy dean, College of Pharmacy, Al Ain University of Science and technology, Abu Dhabi, UAE. Dr. Abuhamdah has published many original research articles in peer-reviewed journals and participated in the preparation of many symposium abstracts. Dr. Abuhamdah is a member of the British Pharmacological Society (BPS), British Neuroscience Association (BNA), Sigma Phi Sigma Pharmaceutical Sciences Honor Society, University of Toledo, USA, Jordan Pharmaceutical Association and has been serving as an editorial board member of reputable pharmaceutical journals.

Abstract:

Agitation is a common clinical challenge; it often precedes the diagnosis of common age-related disorders of cognition such as Alzheimer's disease. More than 80 percentages of people who develop Alzheimer's eventually become agitated or aggressive. Agitation also accompanies dementia, it has been estimated that agitated behaviour occurs in 70-90 percentage of the patients with dementia at some point during their illness. An ideal agent for the acute treatment of agitated patients should be easy to administer and not traumatic; provide tranquilization without excessive sedation; have a rapid onset of action and have low risk for significant adverse reactions and drug interactions. Currently available pharmacologic treatments for agitation do not fulfil all of these criteria; there are significant unmet needs for novel anti-agitation treatments. Several plant species are used for their effect on symptoms such as anxiety, restlessness, and excitability these include Melissa officinalis, commonly known as lemon balm a member of the mint family, has been considered for many centuries as a "calming" herb. It was used as far back as the middle ages to reduce stress and anxiety and promote sleep. In order to elucidate the pharmacological basis for Melissa actions, a pharmacological screen has been conducted using radioligand binding focusing on a range of ligand-gated ion channels, in rat cortical membranes. Melissa oils were sourced from four separate authenticated suppliers. Interactions of the oils with both G-protein coupled receptors (5-HT1A, 5-HT2A, muscarinic M1 and histamine H3) and ligand-gated ion channel receptors (NMDA, nicotinic and GABAA channel, agonist and benzodiazepine sites) implicated in agitation in severe dementia have been examined.

Speaker
Biography:

Bayan Darwesh has completed his pharm D from King Abdulaziz  University in Jeddah. She is  director of Pharmacy Department in King Abdulaziz University Hospital in Jeddah. 
She is responsible to Initiate Pharmacy Automation projects to streamline and modernize the daily routine workflow in line with international standards. 

Abstract:

The use of automated dispensing systems has been lauded for improving patient safety within the processes of healthcare. Adverse drug events, for example, are a common manifestation of faults in the service delivery of a pharmacy department that endanger patient safety. Even though automation may reduce the occurrence of such errors, concerns have been raised about the efficiency and safety of the automated systems since a large number of patients still suffer medication associated injuries. Though the use of these systems is common in some developed countries, there is paucity of safety and efficacy data from the Arab nations. We therefore report our experience using automated dispensing systems in all our units at the KAUH following a successful pilot run of this technology. 
 
Materials and methods: We installed the automated dispensing system and monitored the number of controlled and uncontrolled medications used before and after the automation, the incidence of wrong bin opening and the number of IV medication preparations after the installation of the system.
 
Results: The number of controlled and uncontrolled medications dispensed in KAUH generally reduced. The decrease in the number of uncontrolled medication was statistically significant, p value 0.004. We also observed an increase in the number of IV medication preparations consequent to reduced workload and improvement in staff utilization. After installation of the automated dispensing system there was a high incidence of wrong bin opening, which reduced gradually after the first two months.

Speaker
Biography:

Saeed Albaraki completed his PhD from University of Leeds, UK in 2011 in industrial pharmacy and pharmaceutical engineering.  Dr. Albaraki is the Deputy Director of the Scientific Research Centre of the Medical Services of the Armed Forces, KSA. He has published his research work on pharmaceutical formulation, manufacturing, plasma fractionation and pharmaceutical engineering in reputed journals and has also presented his work in national and international scientific conferences and meetings.

Abstract:

Technically, human plasma for fractionation may be obtained by separation of plasma from whole blood (recovered plasma) or by apheresis (source plasma). The use of Apheresis technique is very helpful in the recovery of plasma and yields almost four times more than other techniques. The bulk of the plasma collected for fractionation is provided by paid donors. For example, USA plasma derived yield from whole blood amounted to 3.5 million litres, while 12 million litres was obtained via plasmapheresis. As with other pharmaceutical industries, PDM fractionation investment is based on four aspects, Knowhow, market, high capital and raw material (Plasma). The main obstacle to start local plasma fractionation is the maintenance of a regular, adequate and safe source of supply of around 300K litres of   plasma. In case of shortage of plasma supplies, the alternative project such as self-sufficiency program (SSP) need to be implemented. Finland, Malaysia, Norway and Singapore are good example of self-sufficiency fractionation toll of local plasma. SSP based on local collection of plasma (around 30k-50k litres ) and shifting fractionation through special contracts with international fractionators. Consumption of PDM products such coagulation factors FVIII and FIX, albumin and immunoglobulins (IVIG) shows around 10% annual increment. The recent applications of IVIG in  Alzheimer’s disease  and some other  neurological disorders has created a profound interest and use of PDM products. Unlike pharmaceutical industry, around 40% of the final price for the manufacturing of PDM  goes to raw materials and not to marketing. Collection of local plasma for fractionation will dramatically reduce the final prices of the products. In addition, building up a national  collection program of plasma will increase the local strategic stock for any crisis. The fractionated yield of coagulation factors produced by Self-sufficiency fractionation program is very high and will greatly  help to start a prophylaxis program for haemophilic patients. Local fractionation or SSP will also help in the creation of the much needed  local employment opportunities and support the local economy. SSP will also  help to secure a reglar , uninterrupted  and safe supply for the patients receiving PDM . A better quality control can also be implemented to strenghten the safety standards of the final products and the influence of any possible gene therapy will be excluded.

Tuba Aydin

Agri Ibrahim Cecen University, Turkey

Title: Effects of Herniarin on sepsis induced rats’ liver
Speaker
Biography:

Tuba Aydin is currently working as an assistant professor in the Faculty of Pharmacy at the Agri Ibrahim Cecen University, Turkey where she has been a faculty member since 2013. She completed her PhD at Ataturk University, Turkey. She has expertise in isolation and characterization of phytochemicals from natural products.

Abstract:

Sepsis has a development that can result in death, through the passage into the blood of microorganisms entering the body and spreading to all organ systems. Artemisia dracunculus L., tarragon, which is used in various parts of the world as spice, has long been used in traditional therapy. Tarragon leaves have important coumarin content and contain high amounts of herniarin (HRN).

One of the most frequently used animal models in the study of sepsis is cecal ligation-puncture in rats’. In the present study, effects of HRN, isolated from tarragon, was investigated on sepsis induced rats’ liver tissues. Therefore, 40 male rats were divided into 4 groups as Sham, Control, HRN-150 and HRN-300. HRN was orally given (at doses of 150 and 300 mg/kg), and then rats’ cecums were ligatured and perforated by a cannule. After 24 hours after administration of HRN, rats were euthanized under high dose anesthesia. Both histopathologic and biochemical examinations were performed in the liver tissues of sepsis induced rats.  Lipid peroxidation (LPO) and glutathione (GSH) levels, as well as superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) activities were measured as biochemical parameters.

In the control group, as compared with sham group, both LPO level and CAT activity increased significantly (p <0.05), in contrast to the decreased amouts of GSH and SOD activity.  In the HRN groups, the LPO and CAT was significantly decreased, and also decreased amouts of GSH and SOD activity was increased dose dependently. According to the results histopathologically, damage findings are decreased as parallel to the biochemical data in a dose-dependent manner. As conclusion HRN dose-dependently decreased sepsis resultant liver damage (p <0.05).

Biography:

Mona Alqahtani is a student in College of Pharmacy- King Saud University, Saudi Arabia.

Abstract:

Background and Objectives: Rheumatoid Arthritis patient’s adherence to pharmacologic therapy is important to achieve therapeutic goals and improve outcomes. Our study objectives are to explore the adherence level, disability index and pain score in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and to understand the relationship between certain patient variables with adherence and Disability. Design and settings: A cross-sectional study with a self-administered questionnaire to RA patients. Participants gave their consent and were recruited from outpatient pharmacy waiting areas in different tertiary hospitals in Riyadh, the capital city of Saudi Arabia. Patients and Methods: This study Included (126) adults with Rheumatoid Arthritis. A self-administered questionnaire to RA patients using a special tool that collect demographic and clinical information, adherence and outcome assessment. 4 pages survey that contains three sections: (1) demographic and clinical data, (2) Adherence measured using 8-item Morisky Medication Adherence Scale (MMAS-8) by using validated Arabic version to assess patient's adherence, (3) Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ) to assess patient's outcomes. RESULTS: Scores of (MMAS-8items) ranging from 0 to 8 shows that approximately one-half the participants were (n=66) 52.3% non-adhered or show low adherence while (n=12) 9.5% of patients were adhered (high adherence), the remaining participants (n=48) shows 38% medium adherence. Those non-adhered almost (n=23) 18.2% of them shows low adherence after the first 5 years of diagnosis. About (n=35) 27.7% of none adhered had from 2-3 medications used for RA while those had more than three medications shows only (n=19) 15% low adherence. There were no significant differences between clinical and demographic variables between groups. CONCLUSIONS: The vast majority of RA patients have low to medium adherence score. Advanced age, years of diagnosis and number of medication significantly affect disability score. However, there is no relationship between these factors and pain score.

Speaker
Biography:

Collins Ovenseri Airemwen bagged a Doctor of Pharmacy (PharmD) degree from the University of Benin, Benin-City, Nigeria and a Master of Philosophy degree in Pharmaceutics and Pharmaceutical Technology with a distinction from the same University in 2016. He is currently pursuing his PhD. He has published more than 8 papers. His research is on controlled drug delivery.

Abstract:

This study was carried out to formulate and evaluate gastro-retentive floating matrix tablets (GRFMTs) of Metformin using Grewia mollis gum.

Grewia polysaccharide gum was obtained from the inner stem bark of the edible plant Grewia mollis, Juss, (Fam. Tiliaceae). Granules were prepared by wet granulation technique using the extracted natural gums at varying concentrations (2, 4, 6 and 8% w/w). Sodium bicarbonate (30%) and tartaric acid (5%) were incorporated as the gas generating agents. All granules were evaluated for micromeritic properties. Granules were compressed at an optimized compression pressure of 35 arbitrary unit on the load scale using a single punch tableting machine. Tablets were evaluated for hardness, friability, floating lag time, in vitro buoyancy test and drug release profiles. Compatibility test of the excipients with the API (metformin) was also done using FTIR.

Results revealed that all formulated GRFM granules were free flowing with angle of repose and Carr’s index ≤ 31º and ≤ 14% respectively. The floating lag time for GRFM tablets formulated with Grewia mollis was ≤ 850 s. The in vitro buoyancy test of GRFM tablets formulations using the natural gum alone (i.e. without the incorporation of Eudragit® RL100) were <12 h while those formulations with the incorporation of Eudragit® RL100 were >12 h. There was a significant difference in tablet hardness with increase in binder concentration (p<0.05). The % maximum release (m) and time to attain this (t) for all GRFMTs were ≥87% and ≥4 h respectively. All the formulations fitted well into Higuchi model release kinetics. Release exponent (n) for all the formulations have their exponent values > 0.45, hence their release mechanism was by Non-Fickian diffusion.

GRFM tablets of metformin have been developed for the first time using Grewia mollis gum which can sustain drug formulation for up to 10 h and improve the bioavailability of drugs with narrow absorption window in the upper part of the GIT. Batch GM5 showed a better sustained release profile which can be taken as the optimized formulation.

Biography:

Mr. Kaselekela Ponshano completed his advanced diploma in Pharmacy at the age of 27 years from Evelyn Hone College, Zambia and advanced studies in the rational management of medicines from Swiss Tropical Institute, Switzerland. He is the coordinator for pharmacovigilance in the northern region of Zambia. He has published more than 2 papers in reputed journals and has served as the secretary for the Copperbelt University Senior Administrative Staff association (CUSASA). He is the current senior Pharmacy technologist at the Copperbelt University.

Abstract:

Hypertension is described as the persistent increase in blood pressure (BP) above 120/80mmg. With the introduction of newer medicines such as TELMA-H (Telmisartan + hydrochlorothiazide) as well as Amlodipine, many patients used to take other antihypertensive drugs for the management of hypertension which proved to be not bearing positive results to some patients. TELMA-H plus Amlodipine drug was suggested to be introduced to some of the hypertensive patients whose responses to other antihypertensive were not good. A study was done to assess its effectiveness at the Copperbelt University health facility.

A total of 35 male and female clients with unstable BP as well as those not responding well on other antihypertensive drugs were enrolled on the study. The patient’s drug regiments were changed upon their review dates. A register was then opened for all the clients enrolled. The information captured on the register included names of Clients, their current BP, their previous drug regiments and the dates the therapy changed. The treatment were administered once daily for 2 months. A follow- up was made to all patients weekly starting from 1 to 8. Every week there BP were monitored and measured.

Reduced BP was observed to the desired levels. The systolic and diastolic blood pressure reduction were identified in all the clients than to those whom we did not change the therapy. The reduction in BP improved the quality life. treatment of hypertension using TELMA-H plus Amlodipine was proved to be effective in the management of hypertension.