Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 8th Annual Pharma Middle East Congress Dubai, UAE.

Day 1 :

Keynote Forum

Randall J Bjork

Lotus Health, USA

Keynote: The emergence of neurotherapeutics

Time : 10:30-11:00

OMICS International Pharma Middle East 2016 International Conference Keynote Speaker Randall J Bjork photo
Biography:

 

Randall J Bjork is a Neurologist from North Dakota who has been in practice for over three decades, mostly in Colorado, emphasizing humane and ethical dementia care. He was involved in dementia treatment research from the early days of Cognex. He has conducted research with Aricept treatment and MRS evaluation in Down-Alzheimer patients. He is involved in a multi-center ketamine treatment protocol of treatment-resistant depression and post-traumatic stress disorder. He has lectured worldwide, contributed to the literature of cardiac arrest, stroke, myoclonus, Alzheimer disease, prionoses and has recently published a children's book, The ABCs of You, Volume I, available on Amazon.

Abstract:

From the time of the Glorious Age of Egypt, neurological function has been a source of fascination in those with the wherewithal to observe and contemplate. Imhotep was, in fact, the first to document his obsession with the implications of lesions to the brain and spine. He introduced the concept of triage in his observations, contemplations and formulations. Pythagoras theorized that the brain was the seat of the mind and thought, shaping Greco-Roman thinking. IbnSina was the greatest thinker of the Golden Arabian Age, discussing the relationship of the obvious physical, inobvious metaphysical and immortality. Great minds over the millennia have refined our thinking to lead us to our conference here in Dubai. Some of those great minds will be discussed and the evolution of therapies for the brain and mind will be presented in an historical overview, with a view to a potentially revolutionary future in neurotherapeutics. We are on the verge of a New Era in the treatment and prevention of the most worrisome affliction of mankind: dementia.

Keynote Forum

Farida Dabouz

FB2D Clinical Research Consulting Inc., Canada

Keynote: The importance of a detailed statistical analysis plan in clinical study report writing

Time : 11:00-11:30

OMICS International Pharma Middle East 2016 International Conference Keynote Speaker Farida Dabouz photo
Biography:

Farida Dabouz holds a PhD in Statistics with a broad industry experience as well as academic international oncology group in Europe and Canada. In addition to her many accomplishments in Biostatistics/Data Management at Sanofi and BCIRG, she also leverages her experience in “data quality” on applying innovative approaches in the field of biostatistics, data management and medical writing to improve data processing. She has a strong experience in training site investigators and operational teams, covering all data aspects, mainly demystifying statistics in clinical trials. She is Certified/Active Member of SOCRA and SCDM education committee, providing webinars and online courses.

Abstract:

Clinical trials are conducted on all new medicines and devices. Regulators will only approve a new medicine or device if these trials, together with other research data, demonstrate it has a favorable risk: benefit profile. Historically, the majority of patients recruited into clinical trials for medicine development have been from Western Europe and the US. However, clinical trials are increasingly recruiting patients from other countries, including developing countries. Also, the landscape for clinical trials has continued to evolve and change over the last twenty years. Clinical trials have become more complicated but not more efficient. The increased complexity of today’s clinical trials is associated with reduced patient enrollment and retention, higher risk for protocol amendments, and longer and more costly clinical trials. Clinical trials are used to assess the benefits and harms of interventions in health care, and if conducted properly, the risk of bias is minimized, particularly bias in selection of patient populations, endpoints and analysis. There is, however, considerable evidence that clinical trials are not always well reported. The usefulness of a Clinical Study Report (CSR) depends on the clarity with which it details the relevance of its, participants, outcomes, and design to the real world practice. ICH E3 is guidance on how to present the results in order to provide a level of details that will enable a secondary evaluation i.e. an assessment by regulatory authorities of the conducted analysis and conclusions drawn. ICH E9 is guidance on the content of the Statistical Analysis Plan (SAP) and presents recommendations for information to be included in key sections of CSR. A well written and complete research protocol is essential for a high quality study and avoids problems during the study. Clear and unambiguous SAP minimizes the risk of bias in the analysis and provides detailed statistical methodology used as well as the definition of Tables, Figures and Listings (TFLs) to be included in the CSR. Clear, complete and concise CSR streamlines regulatory review, publishing and facilitate the use of study results in real word. 

 

OMICS International Pharma Middle East 2016 International Conference Keynote Speaker Maria Lindau photo
Biography:

Maria Lindau, a Licensed Psychologist and PhD, is an Associate Professor at the Dept. of Psychology, Stockholm University, Sweden. She has about 20 publications, and 15 years of experience as Neuropsychologist and is a Researcher at Memory Clinics at Karolinska and Uppsala University Hospitals. She has Bachelor of Arts in History, French and Political Science

Abstract:

Neuropsychological assessment is time-consuming, and examination of healthy individuals with the ten core Wechsler Adult Intelligence scale, Fourth Ed., (WAIS-IV) subtests to assess Full- Scale IQ (FSIQ) may well exceed 90 minutes. Clinical testing of patients must be presumed to take even more than 90 minutes, and additional time is required for the fi ve optional subtests in the battery. In order to reduce testing time a considerable amount of studies have been produced to identifythe most statistically reliable abbreviation of the WAIS. One of the most commonly used short forms (SF) of WAIS-IV is the sevensubtest short form of the WAIS-IV, originally developed by Ward (1990). Th is SF includes the following subtests: Block Design (BD), Similarities (SI), Digit Span (DS), Arithmetic (AR), Information (IN), Coding (CD) and Picture Completion (PC).
According to Meyers et al., 2013, this SF has good psychometric qualities. Of importance is that the subtests included in this SF are selection of tests whose validity and reliability are based on norms from an American sample. However, the prevailing view is that neuropsychological tests must take cultural diff erences into consideration, with respect to the content of the testing tasks as well as the norms used to estimate the performance levels. Therefore, the aim was to validate the seven-subtest SF on a Swedish non-clinical sample. In order to see if the time consumption was possible to lower even more, the aim was also to explore a further reduction of the number of WAIS-IV subtests. Th e study sample consisted of 138 subjects (74f/64m) ranging from 19 to 90 in age. Data from the seven subtests was analyzed with linear regression. Th e results indicated that the sevensubtest model predicted 93.5% of IQ, p<.0005, and a four-subtest model consisting one test from each index: CD, SI, BD and AR predicted 88.3% of IQ, p<.0005, which means that the FSIQ prediction accuracy for both models was extremely high. SFs are particularly helpful in the investigation of psychiatric and geriatric patients. When an understanding of the patient’s functioning across cognitive domains administration of a complete WAIS may be to recommend.

  • Pharmacological Sciences | Bio-Pharmaceutical Sciences | Nanotechnology | Drugs and Regulations Industrial Pharmacy and Pharmacy Practice
Location: Salon VI & VII, JW Marriott Dubai, UAE
Speaker

Chair

Novotny L

Kuwait University, Kuwait

Speaker

Co-Chair

Dong-Kwon Rhee

Sungkyunkwan University, South Korea

Speaker
Biography:

Ladislav Novotny was born on October 5, 1955 in Svitavy, Czechoslovakia. He had obtained his Bachelor’s Degree in Pharmaceutical Science from Kharkov Pharmaceutical Institute, Ukraine in 1980; Doctor of Pharmaceutical degree from Charles University in 1981; Doctor of Philosophy degree from Czechoslovak Academy of Sciences in Prague in 1984; Doctor of Science degree from Slovak Academy of Sciences, Bratislava in 1997. He is working as a Professor of Pharmaceutical Chemistry in Kuwait University, since 1998. He is the acting dean of Faculty Pharmacy, since 2003. He is the member of Kuwait Pharmaceutical Association, European Association Cancer Research, American Association Cancer Research, Slovak Pharmacol. Society, Slovak Pharmaceutical Society. He contributed more than 140 articles to reputed Science journals.

Abstract:

Bleomycin, the first-line treatment for many cancers, is present in the clinical administrations as a mixture of related glycopeptides - bleomycin A2 (55-70 %) and bleomycin B2 (25-32 %) together with other minor components. For better understanding of the mechanism of action of different bleomycin fractions, especially the relation to bleomycin resistance, a development of the powerful analytical method with the reliable identification and quantitation of bleomycin in pharmaceutical and biological matrices is highly important. Methods used for the analysis of bleomycins include the approaches based on HPLC-UV with an ion-pair reagent precluding a combination of HPLC and mass spectrometry. Therefore, in this work, an HPLC method based on HILIC (hydrophilic interaction chromatography) principles was proposed for the separation, identification and determination of both major bleomycin fractions when using an on-line combined MS detection (Q-TOFMS). The performance parameters of the HPLC-Q-TOFMS method showed high reliability, selectivity and sensitivity of the method with ng/ml-pg/ml LOD and determination of the accurate molecular weight of the analytes. The applications reported include determination of the bleomycin A2 and B2 in the commercial infusions and identification of bleomycin A2 and B2 in plasma samples. It may be concluded that the proposed HPLC-Q-TOFMS method is a powerful tool for the separation, identification and determination of two major bleomycin fractions with a possibility to determine an accurate molecular weight of these fractions in the samples. The exact characterization as well as simple, sensitive and reliable monitoring in variable multicomponent matrices is made possible by our method.

Pierrick Nun

University of Nantes, France

Title: How isotopes can help to authenticate the origin of drugs?

Time : 12:35-12:55

Speaker
Biography:

Pierrick NUN has completed his PhD in 2009 from Montpellier University, France, where he worked on the application of alternative methodologies as mechanochemistry in organic solvent-free synthesis. After post-doctoral positions at St Andrews University, Scotland, on gold catalysis, and University of Caen, France, on phosphine-boranes reactivity, he was appointed assistant professor in Nantes in 2012. He is currently working on applications of iqNMR in environmental and pharmaceutical sciences and has published 27 papers and book chapters in peer-reviewed journals.

Abstract:

Nowadays several analytical techniques are available to help characterize pharmaceutical compounds: physical profile, X-ray diffraction, infrared spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, liquid or gas chromatography, NMR. These techniques make it possible to assess the identity and the purity of the Active Pharmaceutical Ingredient (API), the eventual presence of impurities and/or solvent traces and their abundance. On the basis of such information, a fingerprint of the drug can be established: this can be used to compare it with possible counterfeit APIs. Nevertheless, in many cases it is probable that the same synthetic route and identical purification techniques will have been used. In these circumstances, no significant differences will be seen between the two sources of medicine. Moreover, these analyses cannot, in most cases, give any information on the origin of the reagents and solvents used, or on the synthetic pathway chosen if no characteristic impurities are detected. The EBSI team (Elucidation of Biosynthesis by Isotopic Spectrometry, partner 1) has a highly-developed experience in NMR and, more precisely, in isotope ratio monitoring by NMR (irm-NMR). Quantitative 13C NMR has already been successfully applied to a range of molecules including glucose, vanillin, paracetamol and aspirin and used to show the position-dependent isotopic fractionation occurring during reactions or purifications. Two different applications will be presented here: (i) can irm-NMR give an answer in the actual debate around the origin of Tramadol, natural or anthropogenic? (ii) could the isotopic fingerprint provide a unique tool for the authentication of drugs, depending of their synthesis, manufacturer or the origin of reactants?

Speaker
Biography:

Dong-Kwon Rhee has completed his PhD at University of Illinois at Chicago in 1988 and Post-doctoral studies from Yale University School of Medicine. He was the Director of World Class University at Sungkyunkwan University (SKKU) one of the fastest rising universities in the World and School of Pharmacy ranked at the top 45th. He has published 159 papers in reputed journals and is serving as a president of Korean Society of Ginseng.

Abstract:

More than 50% of sepsis cases are caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus), and hospital mortality related to sepsis comprises 52% of all hospital deaths. Therefore, sepsis is a medical emergency, and any treatment against the agent that produces it, is welcome. Here, the protective effect of Korean red ginseng (KRG) extract against pneumococcal infection and sepsis was elucidated. KRG-pre-treated mice (100 mg/kg of KRG) had significantly higher survival rates and body weights than those of the non-treated controls; KRG-pre-treated mice had lower bacterial number and morbidity than those of the non-treated controls. 100 mg/kg of KRG administration decreased cytokine levels including TNF-α and IL-1β, nitric oxide level, and neutrophil infiltration 48 h post-infection, in vivo. In pneumococcal infection, KRG pre-treatment downregulated TLR 4 and TNF-ɑ expressions in RAW 264.7 macrophage cells and increased cell survival by activating PI3K/AKT signaling. Taken together, 100 mg/kg of KRG appeared to protect host cells from lethal pneumococcal sepsis by inhibiting inflammation as well as by enhancing bacterial clearance thereby reinforcing cell survival against pneumococcal infection.

Fabiola Porta

University of Basel, Switzerland

Title: Targeted polymer vesicles to lectin receptors
Speaker
Biography:

Fabiola Porta has studied Medicinal Chemistry and Pharmaceutical Technology in Milan at Universita’ degli studi, where she has obtained her Master’s degree in Pharmacy in 2008. She then moved to the Leiden Institute of Chemistry where she graduated in Chemistry with a special focus in nanoparticles synthesis and characterization. After the completion of her PhD, she started to work as Post doctorate and joined the group of Prof. Huwyler at University of Basel. She is currently developing novel polymer based nanoparticles as drug delivery systems. She is particularly interested in the design of innovative smart responsive nanovesicles.

Abstract:

Polymer vesicles are attracting much attention as alternative nano-delivery system to implement drug targeting strategies. Polymersomes have several interesting features; for instance, ease of chemical modification of the polymer chains can be used to modulate their tissue specificity and organ distribution. A wide variety of polymers is available, however a good candidate for pharmaceutical formulations is the di-block copolymer poly(dimethylsiloxane)-b-poly(2-methyloxazoline) (PDMS-PMOXA). This polymer is formed by two subunits which are FDA approved for use in human and for pharmaceutical applications. In this work, we present an innovative polymer vesicle formulation with PDMS-PMOXA di-block copolymer able to specifically target hepatocytes. PDMS-PMOXA polymersomes have been chemically modified with asialofetuin (AF), a desialylated glycoprotein whose uptake is mediated by the hepatocyte asialoglycoprotein receptor. AF was conjugated on the surface of PDMS-PMOXA polymer vesicles. The protein retained the initial functionality upon chemical modification, allowing a successful uptake of polymersomes in human liver carcinoma cells (HepG2). Active uptake of modified PDMS-PMOXA polymersomes was successfully demonstrated using fluorescence activating cell sorting (FACS) analysis. Biocompatibility of PDMS-PMOXA polymer vesicles has been investigated using an alternative animal model as the zebrafish. PDMS-PMOXA polymer vesicles have shown similar properties compared to long circulating nanoparticles; moreover, they uniformly disperse in the blood circulation, and no protein aggregation was observed. In conclusion, active targeting of HepG2 cells using AF modified PDMS-PMOXA polymersomes was successfully achieved. We envision that PDMS-PMOXA polymersomes can act as a platform to develop innovative drug delivery systems with tunable features for clinical applications.

Speaker
Biography:

Amna Beshir Medani has completed her PhD from University of Khartoum and Post-doctoral studies from University of Khartoum, School of Veterinary Medicine. She is an Associate Professor of Pharmacology and Toxicology UMST, Faculty of Pharmacy, a premier founder of Toxline.org, and a member of many international organizations and bodies. She has published more than 27 papers in reputed journals and conferences and has been serving as an Editorial Board Member of repute.

Abstract:

This workshop was prepared to elevate the standard of knowledge of toxinology from microbial sources among the medical and paramedical staff who are concerned with the treatment of patients poisoned by natural sources of toxins, classify microbial toxins and relate these classes to certain geographical area. This is to ease diagnosis in case of suspicion, facilitate the availability of antidotes in the appropriate geographical districts in relation to microbial toxin back ground, enhance easy, toxin-specified and economic models of research, connect personnel interested in this field, train them and lead an open access for contact between them. This in turn will ease communication between companies investing in therapy and the medical staff (Toxicology personnels, Emergency room staff, First aid personnel, Lay public in highly endemic areas, Community and public health personnel, Drug biotechnology manufacturers and Other interested segments). This course contains an introduction (1 hour) (History, culturally associated stories and social legends), a classification (1 hour) according to origin and geographical distribution , causes of intoxication due to toxins from microbial origin (2 hour).

Speaker
Biography:

Christina Yuen Ki Leung completed two Bachelor degrees in England, BSc Management Sciences degree followed by the BPharm Pharmacy degree. Following the registration as a pharmacist in the UK, she worked in different London Teaching Hospitals for 16 years. In the last 12 years in UK, she specialized in Paediatrics (especially in PICU and Paediatric Liver), Obstetrics and Gynaecology. She published two articles relating to drugs use in paediatric liver diseases in the UK Children Liver Diseases Magazine. She is also a registered pharmacist in Hong Kong and she is currently working as the Senior Pharmacist (Clincial Pharmacy in Charge) at the HKU-SZH in China. She is also the Honorary Lecturer at the University of Hong Kong. She delivers lectures to the Master and Undergraduate Pharmacy students relating to Paediatrics, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.

Abstract:

HKU-SZH has adopted the good pharmacy practices from the West and has implemented an advanced clinical pharmacy system. We regard medication safety and quality of patient care as our highest priorities. We have implemented a number of quality improvement plans since opening. The clinical pharmacists join the doctor-led ward rounds on high risk wards, e.g. ICU. For newly admitted in-patients, the pharmacists carry out medication reconciliation and the information is recorded in the electronic prescribing system. They check the prescriptions for clinical appropriateness and provide drug information. Pharmacists involve actively in the warfarin patient counseling service and stroke clinical pathway on the wards. The pharmacists also liaise closely with the doctors to prepare management policies and guidelines, e.g. high alert drugs policy and Fentanyl patch guideline. Clinical pharmacists participate in the smoking cessation clinic, paediatric and adult respiratory clinics, diabetic clinic to provide patient counseling services. In addition, clinical pharmacists deliver drugs-related educational talks to the patients in the cardiac rehabilitation centre, endocrine ward, and in the out-patient forum (examples of talks: drugs use in hepatitis, safe and effective use of insulin, effective use of inhalation devices, and medication safety in children. Clinical Pharmacists have prepared over 40 patient drug information leaflets and 5 videos relating to inhalation skills to enhance patients’ education. All these improvement plans are to enhance medication safety and optimization of drugs use. The clinical pharmacists have learnt that all these cannot be achieved without an effective multi-disciplinary teamwork and a commitment in continuous quality improvements.

Speaker
Biography:

Zhen-Fang Lin is the Assistant Professor of School of Pharmacy, College of Medicine, National Taiwan University in Taiwan. She holds a PhD in Pharmacy from National Taiwan University and a MPH in Public Health from University of Minnesota.

Abstract:

Acute coronary syndrome (ACS) is a major cause of death and hospital admissions of old people. Clinical trials have reported the benefits of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEI) and angiotensin receptor blockers (ARB), aspirin, beta-blockers, clopidogrel, and statins for reducing the incidence of morbidity and mortality after ACS, but little is known about the effects of comorbidities and their possible association with re-hospitalizations of ACS patients. The objective of our study was to assess whether there are any associations between the age of patients and re-hospitalization for ACS, and between ten relatively common comorbidities – atrial fibrillation, dementia, diabetes mellitus, heart failure, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, liver disease, peripheral vascular disease, renal disease, and schizophrenia – and re-hospitalization for ACS. A retrospective cohort study of all patients recorded as hospitalized in Taiwan for ACS between January 1, 2006, and December 31, 2010 was conducted using claims data from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD) 2005-2011. The relationship between use of up to five medications and a re-hospitalization for ACS was analyzed using a multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression model. The study identified 212,110 patients with ACS; the mean age was 66.0±12.9; and 34.6% were female. A higher number of medications was found to be associated with lower risk of re-hospitalization for ACS, in particular in the 5-medications group (adjusted HR=0.72, 95%, CI: 0.65-0.81, HR=0.72, 95%, CI: 0.61-0.85, for men and women respectively). No significant association between a higher number of medications and a decreased risk of re-hospitalization for ACS was seen among the youngest age group (age<45 years old) or the oldest age group (age≥75 years old). A non-significant additive effect was found among patients with renal disease, heart failure, and dementia. Further research needs to be undertaken to clearly identify the associations between comorbidities, co-medications, gender, age, and treatments and outcomes of patients with cardiovascular diseases, to provide better evidence-based treatment in the coming era of personalized cardiovascular medicine.

Speaker
Biography:

Randall Bjork is a neurologist from North Dakota who has been in practice for over three decades, mostly in Colorado, emphasizing humane and ethical dementia care. Twenty years ago, he advocated economy-of-scale dementia care with the concept of Lotus Health, which he will present here at our Dubai conference. He was involved in dementia treatment research from the early days of Cognex. He has conducted research with Aricept treatment and MRS evaluation in Down-Alzheimer patients. Dr. Bjork is co-author of a paper being presented here by his Swedish colleague, Dr. Lindau, from The University of Stockholm. He is now involved in a multi-center ketamine treatment protocol of treatment-resistant depression and post-traumatic stress disorder. He has lectured worldwide, contributed to the literature of cardiac arrest, stroke, myoclonus, Alzheimer disease, prionoses and has recently published a children's book, The ABCs of You, Volume I, available on Amazon. He has supervised mission medical work in Costa Rica and Nepal. He is an avid motorcyclist, restaurateur, cancer survivor and retired helicopter pilot.

Abstract:

The neuropharmacological treatment of the dementing illnesses, primarily senile dementia of the Alzheimer type, has emphasized central cholinergic augmentation or glutamatergic modulation for the past few decades. More enlightened and, perhaps, disease-modifying strategies have been considered since late last millennium—some of which are close to coming into the clinical arena. Advances in slowing or reversing the progression of neurodegeneration have not, regrettably, proceeded pari passu, with significant developments in biomarker-based diagnosis of the neurodegenerative diseases. Senile dementia of the Alzheimer type, parkinsonian disorders, diffuse Lewy body disease, fronto-temporal dementia, cortico-basal degeneration and the prionoses can be diagnosed with confidence ante-mortem, but current treatments have been, at the very least, clinically disappointing and, most disturbing, a fountain of false hope for patients and their families. This schism between intellectually exciting early diagnostic measures and worthwhile disease-modifying treatments has led to an ethical dilemma: Should a patient be subjected to an early diagnosis of a neurodegenerative disorder when there is no meaningful treatment? This lecture will present a review of biomarkers and their current place in research and clinical practice, including implications of amyloid/tau imaging. Potential disease-modifying treatments of the future will be presented, with discussion of hypothesized molecular mechanisms of action and potential economic impact. An economy-of-scale, futuristic view of ethical and humane long-term care for those afflicted with neurodegenerative diseases will be presented, because the current model of residential care is not sustainable.

Speaker
Biography:

Dabouz holds a PhD in Statistics with a broad industry experience as well academic international oncology group, in Europe and Canada. In addition to her many accomplishments in Biostatistics/Data Management at Sanofi and BCIRG, she also leverages her experience in “data quality” on applying innovative approaches in the field of biostatistics, data management and medical writing to improve data processing. Dabouz has a strong experience in training site investigators and operational teams, covering all data aspects, mainly demystifying statistics in clinical trials. Dr Dabouz is certified/active member of SOCRA and SCDM education committee, providing webinars and online courses.

Abstract:

Clinical research is a cornerstone of evidence-based medicine as well as a branch of healthcare sciences that determines the safety and effectiveness of medications, devices, diagnostic products and treatment regimens intended for human use. Clinical research is of great value to medical practitioners/institutions but most importantly to patients and the society as a whole. The landscape for clinical trials has continued to evolve and change over the last twenty years. Clinical trials have become more complicated but not more efficient. The increased complexity of today’s clinical trials is associated with reduced patient enrollment and retention, higher risk for protocol amendments, and longer and more costly clinical trials. Clinical trials expand more globally to take advantage of the large treatment naive population in emerging and developing countries. However, there are key factors that need to be taken into considerations to ensure the clinical trials are successful. Concerns such as qualified data and limited number of trained operational team, have deterred pharmaceuticals to conduct their research. Increasing regulation, rising costs, and the number and complexity of clinical trials being conducted are forcing sponsors to be smart and creative in how they conduct clinical research. The advanced technology (EDC, ePRO..) as well as the FDA risk-based guidance and the EMA reflection paper have opened a door to the risk-based monitoring (RBM) paradigm that will help in ensuring trial integrity and validity. Good clinical research must be built upon sound ethical and scientific practice as well as a “data quality culture” within the organization.

Speaker
Biography:

Maria Lindau is a Licensed Psychologist and PhD, and is an Associate Professor at the Dept. of Psychology, Stockholm University, Sweden. She has about 20 publications, and 15 years of experience as neuropsychologist and researcher at memory clinics at Karolinska and Uppsala University Hospitals. She is Bachelor of Arts in History, French and Political Science.

Abstract:

Anosognosia or lack of awareness of one's disabilities, is a complex comorbidity in frontotemporal dementia, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, stroke and schizophrenia. Anosodiaphoria, or lack of concern about one's symptoms, is foremost seen in FTD. In our study of anosognosia and anosodiaphoria in AD and mild cognitive impairment two opposite patterns emerged: in MCI, the better preserved the cognitive ability, the greater the perceived seriousness and worries about the decline, in AD, the lower the cognitive function, the lower the experienced cognitive loss and concern about the deterioration. Our interpretation was that anosognosia and anosodiaphoria increase with the severity of the neurodegeneration, which converge with findings in several other studies. The most plausible is that anosognosia is associated with right hemispheric disturbance. There are contradictory findings about anosognsosia in MCI. Some studies have observed anosognosia in MCI, whereas others have found that MCI patients sometimes over-report their difficulties, which may make them more prone to adhere to treatment than AD patients, whose motivation to medical consultation or pharmacological therapy may be low, since they do not consider themselves as being ill. Memory deficits may also make AD patients forget their medication or physician appointments. Additional analyses with linear regression models of the data from both diagnostic groups (n=21) in our study revealed that episodic memory deficits may explain 30.6% of the variance in anosognosia, p= 0.01, a pattern that has been corroborated by De Carolis et al., 2015. Initial over-rating of difficulties and later a denial of them in a progressive disorder suggest that there is a breaking point where the over-rating starts to decline, e.g. due to memory loss. During the presentation the main findings of our study will be discussed, as well as quantitative breaking points for a shift from an overestimation to an underestimation of difficulties, as well as strategies to handle problems with drug treatment and care of patients not aware of being ill.

Speaker
Biography:

    

Abstract:

The associations IFBV-BELHERB from Luxembourg and M4L from France have established a working relationship with African universities. Several of these partners have run clinical trials with Artemisia annua. In all these trials, a therapeutical effect of 95% or higher was confirmed by the use over 7 days of whole leaf infusion, capsules or tablets. It was surprising that the artemisinin content had little impact on the results. But the most important finding, especially in Kenya and Uganda, was that people who drink one or two cups of Artemisia tea per week became immune against malaria. At Lubumbashi, RD Congo Dr. C Kansango has shown in 2014 that Artemisia annua and Artemisia afra raised CD4+. In fact the antimalarial properties of Artemisia plants other than Artemisia annua are no surprise. The Chinese favored Artemisia apiacea and the French in Algeria during 100 years protected their soldiers against malaria with Artemisia absinthium. In 2015, medical doctors in RD Congo have run randomized clinical trials on a large scale in the Maniema province with the participation of some 1000 malaria infected patients. The trials compared Artemisia annua and afra with ACTs (Coartem and ASAQ). For all the parameters tested herbal treatment was significantly better than ACTs: faster clearance for fever and parasitemia, absence of parasites and gametocytes as confirmed by PCR on day 28 for 99.5% of the Artemisia treatments and 79.5% only for the ACT treatments. A total absence of side effects was evident for the treatments with the plants, but for the 498 patients treated with ACTs, 210 suffered from diarrhea, and/or nausea, pruritus, hypoglycemia etc. The efficiency was equivalent for Artemisia annua and afra. In parallel with the clinical trials against malaria, the same team has completed another large scale randomized, double blind trial against schistosomiasis, Artemisia vs Praziquantel. The results confirm previous anecdotic results. Both arms in this trial had 400 infected patients. The treatment efficiency was 97% in the Artemisia arm and 71% in the Praziquantel arm. No side effects were noticed in the Artemisia treatment. Praziquantel caused vomiting in 26.5% of the patients, abdominal pain in 18.5%, cephalalgy in 15.5%. Very impressive is the fact that the Artemisia led to an unexpected almost complete absence of eggs in feces after 2 months. In 2016 clinical trials have been run against Tuberculosis and Buruli ulcer with Artemisia annua and afra. Screening trials in 2015 had been promising and these recent large scale, randomized, double blind have resulted in an obvious therapeutic effect against Mycobacteria, not only tuberculosis but also Buruli ulcer. After three weeks of treatment the Ziehl stain assay is negative for alcohol-resistant bacteria. All these trials are run in compliance with the WHO protocol, approval of the health authorities of the country, full-fledged ethical approval and encouragements of WHO-Afro.

Speaker
Biography:

Fasiha Shah has completed her MPhil from Punjab University, Pakistan in 2007. Her research topic for MPhil was probiotics. She is working at different teaching posts in RAK Medical & Health Sciences University from 2008 till date as Senior Lecturer and has published around 4 papers as first author and 2 papers as second author.

Abstract:

Delivery of Nutraceuticals using microemulsions-A literature review: Nutraceutical product is a food or fortified food product that not only supplements the diet but also assists in treating or preventing disease, so provides medical benefits. They can be considered non-specific biological therapies used to promote general well-being, control symptoms and prevent malignant processes. They can be classified on the basis of their natural sources, pharmacological conditions, as well as chemical constitution of the products. Most often they are grouped in the following categories: Dietary supplements, functional food, medicinal food and pharmaceuticals. The most common nutra-molecules are phytosterols, lycopenes, vitamin E, luteins, CoQ10 and others. IN the market nutraceuticals are seen in many forms: Some in powdered form, some encapsulated as soft gels, others are dissolved and sold as liquid solutions. Different types of pharmaceutical systems are used to deliver nutraceuticals but stability is a problem. One of the best options explored to solve these problems can be microemulsions.